Dia de Los Muertos and All Souls Memorial Service

all souls ofrenda 2012El Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is an event celebrated in many Latin American countries, particularly in Mexico. The Day of the Dead is a time to remember and honor the deceased and is usually characterized by ofrendas, which are shrines or altars constructed to present offerings to the spirits. Since Dia de los Muertos is considered to be a celebration of eternal life rather than a sad event, ofrendas usually reflect whimsical portrayals of the dead as they were when they were living.

St. Philip’s In The Hills invites you to remember your departed loved ones by contributing to an ofrenda, which will be set up in the Columbarium Garden at St. Philip’s through November 2. Photographs, meaningful objects, and memorabilia are all suitable offerings. Objects may be placed on the ofrenda any time the office is open (Mondays through Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.).

The ofrenda will be used in conjunction with St. Philip’s All Souls’ Day memorial service on November 2. In the Anglican Communion, All Souls’ Day is the traditional time to remember loved ones who have died. On Wednesday, November 2, we will celebrate All Souls’ Day with a special Memorial Eucharist at 7:00 p.m. Particular attention will be given to remembering those who have died within the past two years, but we will celebrate all of our loved ones enjoying eternal life in the nearer presence of God. We invite families to remember their loved ones by lighting one of the votive candles found outside the church door prior to the service and placing it on the altar.

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The service concludes with a candlelit procession into the Columbarium Garden for prayers around the ofrenda. Afterwards, the celebration of life continues with a festive reception.

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For more information, please contact Stella Lopez (299-6421 or stella.lopez@stphilipstucson.org). St. Philip’s is located at 4440 N. Campbell Avenue at River Road. Ample parking is available in the north parking lot or under our solar parking structure on the east side. The Columbarium Garden is located to the west of the main Church building. The office phone is 299-6421.

The Romantic Century – Great Organ Masterworks of Germany & France

jeffrey-campbellSt. Philip’s Friends of Music kicks off its 21st concert season on Sunday, October 30, at 2 p.m. in the Church with The Romantic Century – Great Organ Masterworks of Germany & France. To celebrate the beginning of Dr. Jeffrey Campbell’s 16th year as Associate Music Director and principal organist at St. Philip’s In The Hills, he explores the captivating late-Romantic musical language of Louis Vierne, Max Rogers, and Camille Saint-Saens. Tucson Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster Lauren Rustad Roth joins Dr. Campbell for a rare performance of Josef Rheinberger’s eloquent Sonata for Violin and Organ — a truly sonic celebration of the royal instrument.

Suggested admission for this concert is $15 (students free with ID).

rothThe mission of Friends of Music is to enrich the musical experience of the parish and community through events such as concerts, outreach, education, scholarships, commissions, and support of special musical events. For more information see the Friends of Music web site or call 520.222.7277

St. Philip’s is located at 4440 N. Campbell Avenue at River Road. Ample parking is available in the north parking lot or under the solar parking structure on the east side. The Friends of Music phone number is (520) 222-7277.

 

ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Jeffrey Campbell has distinguished himself throughout North America as an organ recitalist, choral conductor, and clinician. A graduate of both the University of British Columbia and Northwestern University in Chicago, Dr. Campbell has specialized in the interpretation of Bach’s organ and choral music, as well as English and French romantic repertoire. Since August 2001, he has been Associate Music Director and principal organist at the Episcopal Church of St. Philip’s In The Hills, Tucson, where, among other duties, he is responsible for organ music and choral accompaniments as part of a large multi-generational music program. He has accompanied numerous choral groups, soloists and instrumental ensembles throughout Southern Arizona. Recent engagements have included performances on the Fritts organ at St. Alban’s in Tucson, the Evensong Recital series at All Saints, Phoenix, and the new Quimby organ at Catalina United Methodist Church.

Lauren Rustad Roth is concertmaster of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra and was named Assistant Professor of Violin at the University of Arizona in 2013. Previous to these positions, she was concertmaster of the Canton Symphony. In May 2013, Ms. Roth earned a Master of Music degree for the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of William Preucil, concertmaster of The Cleveland Orchestra. She was a member of the Cleveland Pops orchestra and a substitute with The Cleveland Orchestra.

A native of Seattle, Ms. Roth received a Bachelor of Music degree in violin performance and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Italian studies from the University of Washington, where she was a student of Professor Ron Patterson. During that time, she served as concertmaster of the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra, Thalia Symphony, Marrowstone Festival Orchestra, and the UW Symphony.

Ms. Roth has appeared as soloist with the Thalia Symphony, Canton Symphony, Sierra Vista Symphony, and the Tucson Symphony. In 2013 she attended the Tanglewood Music Center and received the Jules C. Reiner Violin Prize. An avid teacher and chamber musician, Ms. Roth was an adjunct faculty member at Holy Names Academy in Seattle. She has served on the faculty of Icicle Creek Music Center, International Lyric Academy in Italy, Prague Summer Nights, and she joined the faculty of the Marrowstone Music Festival in 2014. Ms. Roth has performed at the San Juan Island Chamber Music series, Lexington Bach festival, Mainly Mozart festival, St. Andrew’s Bach Society, and Tanglewood Music center and has collaborated and performed with renowned artists including Christoph von Dohnányi, Charles Dutoit, Ron Patterson, William Preucil, Martin Chalifour, André Watts and Lynn Harrell.

Blessing of the Animals Service

bless of animals3The community is invited to join parishioners at 9 a.m. on Sunday, October 23, to celebrate one of Tucson’s favorite Blessing of the Animals services. The service will be held in the church plaza of St. Philip’s In The Hills Episcopal Church. This observance was begun more than 35 years ago and continues to be one of the most popular events of the church year. It celebrates the loving relationship shared by humans and their pets, with opportunities to give thanks for the blessings animals give to us. Readings and prayers focus on the wonders of our world and our responsibility as humans to be good stewards of God’s creation. All types of animals are welcome at this service. Participants are asked to keep their pets appropriately restrained. (This service does not include communion. The usual Rite II Eucharist will take place in the Church, also at 9 a.m.)

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The public is cordially invited to attend the service. A freewill offering will be collected.

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St. Philip’s is located at 4440 N. Campbell Avenue at River Road. Ample parking is available in the north parking lot, or under our solar parking structure on the east side. The office phone number is 299-6421.

St. Philip’s Day

St Philip croppedSt. Philip’s will celebrate our patron saint on Sunday, May 1. First Sunday Music at the 9 and 11:15 a.m. services will be Missa Gaia (“Earth Mass”) by Paul Winter, presented by St. Philip’s adult choirs with an unusual assortment of instruments. This work is in the genre of New Age/Jazz, which incorporates traditional mass texts as well as English texts — needless to say, it will be very different from our usual First Sunday Music repertoire! Attendees should plan to arrive about 10 minutes before the listed service time so as not to miss any of the music.

The idea of sharing this work came from the ongoing effort to underscore our role as stewards of the earth’s resources. Parishioner Susan Erickson said: “April 22 was Earth Day, and we are celebrating it just a little late. As we listen to this beautiful combination of voices, instruments, and sounds from nature, it will be difficult to imagine a world without nature, without wilderness, without clean air and water. Would you like to explore how, as Christians, we can protect God’s creation? The Green Team at St. Philip’s is seeking to get back on its feet. There are many ‘green issues’ to explore, both small- and large-scale. Get inspired by First Sunday music, and help shape a new environmental ministry at St. Philip’s! For more information, contact Susan Erickson.”

Music Ministry is hoping to highlight this worthy cause through our music — be prepared for some wolf and humpback whale noises on St. Philip’s Day!

st p day fiestaThe celebration continues with festivities in the Plaza. Sometimes it is good to rediscover yourself, and on St. Philip’s Day, all are invited to do just that. Come enjoy a cookout, fun, fellowship, and games as we come together and take the time to be with each other as the community of St. Philip’s In The Hills Parish. Everyone is welcome at this wonderful event. ($10 person / $25 family)

 

Holy Week and Easter at St. Philip’s

St. Philip’s has seven services on Easter Day: 6 a.m. (in the Columbarium garden), 7:45 a.m., two at 9:15 a.m. (one in the Church, one in the Children’s Center Courtyard), 11:15 a.m., 4 p.m. (“Come and See” in the Music Center), and 5:30 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, at 7 p.m. on Holy Saturday evening, is considered the first Easter service. There is at least one service each day during the days of Holy Week. For more information see below. For a downloadable schedule, click here.

Easter Services

great vigil 1The Great Vigil of Easter is held on Holy Saturday, March 26, at 7 p.m. The service begins with the Service of Light (lighting the New Fire and Paschal Candle and candlelit procession, with incense), the Vigil recounting the history of our salvation (through readings and chanting), Holy Baptism, and the first Holy Eucharist of Easter. The service will be followed by a potluck reception: participants are invited to bring their favorite sparkling beverage and chocolate finger food, in addition to noisemakers for the Easter Proclamation.

CIMG0559Easter Day, March 27, will begin at St. Philip’s with a sunrise service at 6 a.m., including hymns, with keyboard and trumpet (held in the Columbarium Garden). At 7:45, there will be a Festival Eucharist Rite I (Eucharist in traditional language), including hymns, with organ and trumpet. At 9:15 there will be two services: an All Generations Eucharist and Baptism outside (in the Children’s Center Courtyard) with the St. Nicholas and Cherub Choirs, handbells, and brass, designed for schoolage children and their families, and a Festival Choral Eucharist Rite II (using more modern language, adopted in 1979) in the Church with adult choirs, handbells, and brass. Another Festival Choral Eucharist Rite II, including incense, will take place at 11:15 a.m., again featuring adult choirs and brass. At 4 p.m. there will be a “Come and See” Eucharist for those who are looking for a reinterpretation of traditional theology. At 5:30 p.m. there is an Evening Eucharist Rite II with hymns.

Holy Week Services

holy week cross 2On Monday of Holy Week, March 21, there is a Holy Eucharist Rite II service at 5:30 p.m. in the Chapel of the Nativity. At 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 22, there is a Holy Eucharist Rite II and Healing service. On Wednesday, March 23, the final Lenten noontime Holy Eucharist Rite II will take place at 12:15 p.m.

The Ancient Office of Tenebrae, on Wednesday evening, March 23, at 7 p.m., is a moving descent into the darkest days of the church year. The liturgy is a merger of the traditional Matins and Lauds, with plainchant led by the Canterbury Choir and Canterbury Apprentices. During the service all of the lights in the church are progressively extinguished except one candle.

20130328_193514The Triduum, or “three sacred days,” begins on Maundy Thursday through Holy Saturday. The Liturgy of Maundy Thursday, March 24, begins with a supper at 6 p.m. Enjoy lasagna, salad, rolls, and dessert, hosted by St. Philip’s Vestry. The liturgy, at 7 p.m. in the Church, includes the traditional footwashing, Eucharist, and Stripping of the Altar, which symbolizes the laying of Jesus in the tomb. Music will include plainchant.

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After the Maundy Thursday service, beginning at 9 p.m. and continuing until 10 a.m. on Friday, March 25, Dante’s Inferno will be read the way the author intended. Each 30-minute segment of the all-night vigil in the Church will include reading of selected cantos from the Inferno, silent meditation, and atmospheric music. Participants may arrive and leave throughout the night. Security will be on site all night.

empty tabernacleIt is traditional to have a noontime service on Good Friday, to correspond with the time Jesus’ suffering on the cross began. The noon Good Friday service at St. Philip’s, on March 25, includes veneration of the cross, the Solemn Collects, and communion from sacrament reserved at the Maundy Thursday service.

The Children’s Way of the Cross takes place on Good Friday at 5:30 p.m. in the Children’s Center. The Way (or “Stations”) of the Cross is a devotional service of prayer and meditation dating from the early centuries of the Church, with stations representing stops on Jesus’ route to Calvary. This will enable children to experience Good Friday in a way that will better enable them to live humble, sacrificial, joyful lives in the Lord’s service.

At 7 p.m. on March 25, a choral ensemble, soloists, and instruments will present the 17th Century work Die sieben Worte Jesu Christi am Kreuz (The Seven Last Words of Jesus Christ from the Cross) by Heinrich Schütz. Each section of this oratorio focuses on one of the phrases uttered by Jesus from the cross, as recorded in the Gospels.

The public is cordially invited to attend. St. Philip’s In The Hills Episcopal Church is located at the northeast corner of River Road and Campbell Avenue (4440 N. Campbell). Ample parking is provided in the north parking lot or under the solar structure on the east side. It is a good idea not to leave valuables in plain sight in your car during Easter services. The office phone is 299-6421.

Amahl and the Night Visitors

It takes a village to raise an opera — in this case the village of St. Philip’s In The Hills Episcopal Church. On January 9, 2016, parishioners with professional credentials in voice, instrumental playing, conducting, stage management, and executive production enable the wider Tucson community to experience Gian Carlo Menotti’s one-act work Amahl and the Night Visitors.

To cast the title role of Amahl, Woosug Kang, director of music at St. Philip’s, approached Julian Ackerley, the director of the Tucson Arizona Boys Chorus, who had the perfect boy for Amahl among his choristers: Liam Boyd. Pierre Isaac, also a Boys Chorus member, is the understudy.

Amahl with Background 1

In this event, Kang will make his operatic conducting debut. Juan Aguirre is the stage director. Dianne Iauco, whose credits include Principal Artist at New York City Opera, will portray the Mother — and role she has sung on numerous occasions.

Resources and talent for the production, including costuming and equipment preparation, comes from the St. Nicholas Choir and their parents. The set design stems in part from the 2014 production, in which director/stage designer David Johnston transformed the St. Philip’s Church environment into an operatic stage and set with suggestive period realism. The Church space will be transformed into the barren cottage where most of the story action takes place.

The remaining principal roles will be performed by professional singers who are also members of the church. The Three Kings have a splendidly matched blend, with each singer’s actual personality well suited to his operatic part. Tenor Matthew Holter is known for his sense of comedy. In his hands the hard-of-hearing King Kaspar delivers the comedic flair the role deserves. Baritone Larry Alexander’s artistic sensitivity highlights the compassionate side of King Melchior, and bass Arizeder Urreiztieta’s stentorian delivery underscores the dignified and mysterious King Balthazar. Daniel Rosenberg, a talented student who has rapidly grown through the ranks of St. Philip’s youth choir, sings the role of the Page. Chorus roles will be filled by members of St. Philip’s adult choirs and St. Nicholas Choir members, directed by Anne Boyer Cotten. Choreographers and dancers will be announced at a later date.

Kings 1

Performances are January 9, 2016, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Premium seating is $50, general admission $25 and students $10. Sponsorships are available for higher levels of support (click here or call 520-222-7277). Proceeds will support the St. Philip’s child and teen choristers’ residency at England’s Worcester Cathedral in July 2016 as well as instrumental and choral training during the school year.

St. Philip’s is located at 4440 N. Campbell Avenue at River Road. Ample parking is available in the north parking lot or under the solar parking structure on the east side. The Friends of Music phone number is (520) 222-7277.

ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The Amahl Story and Background

The opera (in English) was originally commissioned by NBC and first performed by the NBC Opera Theater on December 24, 1951, in New York City at Rockefeller Center. The composer had trouble settling on a subject for the opera, but took his inspiration from Hieronymus Bosch’s The Adoration of the Magi at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. It was the first opera specifically composed for television in America, yet Menotti wrote Amahl with the stage in mind. Amahl was seen on 35 NBC affiliates coast-to-coast, the largest network hookup for an opera broadcast to that date. An estimated 5 million viewers saw the live broadcast — the largest audience ever to see a televised opera.

The thread of Amahl has wound through St. Philip’s since a first production by then-Music Director Stephen Anderson in 1979. Later music directors and professional musicians in the parish wished to perform it again, but not until Kang’s tenure did the complete mix of time, talent, treasure, advocacy and generosity appear to bring Amahl back to St. Philip’s in 2014. Kang’s arrival at St. Philips two years earlier marked a renewed focus in children’s choir programs and a new effort to elevate the quality of the adult choral programs.

Early in 2013 Dianne Iauco, a longtime parishioner and operatic professional, envisioned collaboration between the adult and children’s choirs that could make Amahl possible at St. Philip’s again. After hearing Iauco’s formal proposal, St. Philip’s Friends of Music committed to a full-blown, professional production of Amahl that would not only provide a festive, high-quality musical event but also offer a gift to the larger Tucson community —especially those who may never have experienced the excitement of a live, vocal drama. The production would draw upon the abundance of professional musicians at St. Philip’s In The Hills and other professionals to perform, direct, and stage-manage.

Amahl is a 50-minute work that for many years has been the most frequently performed opera in the U.S. While usually presented before Christmas, it is actually about the gifts of Epiphany and the revealing of the Holy Child to the world.

The opera is set in the Holy Land at the time of the birth of Christ. Amahl is a 10-year-old shepherd who is crippled and must walk with the aid of a crutch which he made. His widowed mother was forced to sell their sheep and they now live in abject poverty. One star-filled winter evening, three Magi appear at their door, seeking shelter for the night before they continue their journey.

The kings enter bearing gold, frankincense, and presumably myrrh. The slightly loony king Kaspar has his box of precious stones, beads, and a special treat for Amahl: black, sweet licorice. While Amahl is fetching the neighbors and some firewood, Melchior asks Amahl’s mother if she has seen “a child whose eyes are sad and whose hands are those of the poor, as poor he was born.” Melchior is, of course, speaking of the Holy Child, but the Mother, who responds that she does indeed know such a child, is instead speaking of her own son.

Neighbors arrive to share what little food they have, offer a dance for entertainment, then leave. While Amahl, the kings, and their page sleep, the mother reflects on the kings’ gold and all that she could do for her son with just one gold coin. “If I take some they will never miss it,” she sings, before stealing a coin. The Page awakens, confiscates the coin, and seizes the Mother. The Kings, transformed by Amahl’s pleas for mercy for his mother, inspire Melchior’s message, which is at the heart of this drama:

Oh, woman, you may keep the gold.
The Child we seek doesn’t need our gold.
On love alone he will build His kingdom,
His pierced hand will hold no scepter,
His haloed head will bear no crown,
His might will not be built on your toil.
Swifter than lightning He will soon walk among us.
He will bring us new life and receive our death.
And the keys to His city belong to the poor.

The widow responds:

Oh, no — wait — take back your gold!
For such a King I have waited all my life
And if I weren’t so poor I would send a gift of my own to such a child.

With childlike innocence and generosity Amahl responds to the King’s pardon and his mother’s impulse by offering his crutch as a gift to the Child. Without thinking, he lifts the crutch, and at this moment — after these transformative acts of forgiveness, faith and sacrifice — Amahl is spontaneously healed of his lameness. At the Kings’ insistence Amahl obtains his mother’s permission to travel with them to find the Christ Child to express his gratitude. Melchior instructs the Page to give the Mother the coin for her to keep; his realization that the Christ Child didn’t need his gold has also made him realize that the Mother does.

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Christmas Eve and Christmas Services

church with wreath

St. Philip’s In The Hills is a large Episcopal church on the northeast corner of River Road and Campbell Avenue, with a beautiful Joesler-designed structure and lovely grounds.We offer special services and other events throughout the Advent season. For a full schedule click here.

A large number of people attend services on Christmas Eve. We offer five services on Christmas Eve (3:30, 5, 7, 9, and 11 p.m.) and one on Christmas Day (11 a.m.). Services are approximately one hour in length except for the Children’s Service, which is about a half-hour.

early service story

live nativityThe 3:30 p.m. service on Christmas Eve is a communion service especially designed for toddlers and preschoolers and their families. Music will feature the Cherub and St. Cecilia Choirs (young children’s choirs), with organ and trumpet. Attendees are invited to bring Baby Jesus from their home crèche (Nativity Set) to be blessed. The service is followed by a live Nativity scene in the church plaza, reenacted by children and a young family from St. Philip’s.

At 4:50 p.m., music begins, which leads into an All-Generations Eucharist at 5 p.m. This is a Holy Eucharist service for school-aged children and their families. Music is provided by the St. Cecilia Choir and St. Nicholas Choir (children’s and youth choirs), with trumpet, handbells, and organ, as well as congregational carol singing. The Chalice Players, a group of youth, will dramatize the Christmas story.

chalice players

The 7 p.m. Candlelit Eucharist with Carols is preceded by music beginning at 6:50. This quiet, reflective Choral Eucharist service is rooted in our ancient Anglican tradition. It includes carols sung by the St. Nicholas Choir and Schola Cantorum; also harp and popular carols for congregational singing.

7pm candlelight

The 9 and 11 p.m. Festival Eucharist services begin with music 10 minutes before the hour. The service music is Mass in G by Franz Schubert, scored for choir, soloists, and chamber orchestra. There will also be handbells and popular carols for congregational singing. The 11 p.m. service includes incense.

late service celebrate

On Christmas Day, congregational carol singing preceding the 11 a.m. service begins at 10:50, followed by the Feast of the Nativity, which is a Holy Eucharist Rite II service with choir and well-loved congregational carols.

The public is cordially invited to attend. Worshippers on Christmas Eve should be aware that they will be waiting in line outdoors and should dress accordingly. Those who want to minimize waiting in line may wish to consider attending the less crowded services, at 3:30, 5, or 11 p.m. or on Christmas Day. We welcome everyone seeking to celebrate the birth of Jesus by worshipping with us.

St. Philip’s is located at 4440 N. Campbell Avenue at River Road. The main parking lot is to the north of the Church. Although there will be security on site, it is advisable not to leave belongings in vehicles. For more information about St. Philip’s, please click here.